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Contributors Biographies

Prof Philip Arestis

Prof Philip Arestis is Professor and University Director of Research, Cambridge Centre for Economics and Public Policy, Department of Land Economy, University of Cambridge, UK; Professor of Economics, Department of Applied Economics V, Universidad del País Vasco, Spain; Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, University of Utah, US; Research Associate, Levy Economics Institute, New York, US; Visiting Professor, Leeds Business School, University of Leeds, UK; Professorial Research Associate, Department of Finance and Management Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, UK. He was awarded the British Hispanic Foundation ‘Queen Victoria Eugenia’ award (2009-2010); also awarded the ‘homage’ prize for his contribution to the spread of Keynesian Economics in Brazil by the Brazilian Keynesian Association (AKB), 15 August 2013. He served as Chief Academic Adviser to the UK Government Economic Service (GES) on Professional Developments in Economics (2005-2013). He has published widely in academic journals, and he is, and has been, on the editorial board of a number of economics journals.

Ayoze Alfageme holds a Bachelor’s degree in Economics and a post-graduate degree in Philosophical and Political Analysis of Capitalism both from the University of Barcelona. He is currently a second year M.A. student in International Economics at the Berlin School of Economics and Law. His current research interests are in the field of Classical and Post-Keynesian macroeconomics, distribution issues, political economy and European economic policies.

Michelle Baddeley

Prof Michelle Baddeley is Professor at the Institute for Choice, University of South Australia, and was Professor in Economics and Finance of the Built Environment at UCL. Before that she was Director of Studies (Economics), Gonville & Caius College/Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge. She has undergraduate degrees in Economics and Psychology from University of Queensland, and an MPhil/PhD (Economics) from University of Cambridge. She has written books and articles/papers across a range of topics, including behavioural economics, neuroeconomics, cybersecurity, applied macroeconomics, regional economics and development economics. She is on editorial boards for the Journal of Cyber Cecurity, the American Review of Political Economy and the Journal of Behavioral Economics and Policy, as well as the Society for the Advancement of Behavioral Economics (SABE)’s advisory board. She has an active interest in public policy and is a member of DEFRA’s Hazardous Substances Advisory Committee, an Associate Fellow – Cambridge Centre for Science and Policy and was a member of the Blackett Review Expert Panel: FinTech Futures 2014-15.

David Bailey

Prof David Bailey is Professor of Industrial Strategy at the Aston Business School. He has written extensively on industrial and regional policy, especially in relation to manufacturing and the auto industry. His recent research has been funded by a number of state and private organisations including the ESRC. He recently undertook an INTERREG project on the role of FDI in cluster upgrading, and is an Area Coordinator (on industrial policy) for the FP7 project WWW for Europe (Welfare, Wealth, Work). He is a regular blogger, newspaper columnist and media commentator. He was Chair of the Regional Studies Association over 2006-12 and is now an Honorary Vice-Chair, and an Editor of the journals Regional Studies, and Policy Studies.

Prof Terry Barker

Prof Terry Barker is Founder of the Cambridge Trust for New Thinking in Economics, Founding Director of Cambridge Econometrics, and Departmental Senior Fellow in the Cambridge Centre for Climate Change Mitigation Research (4CMR), Department of Land Economy, University of Cambridge. He was a Co-ordinating Lead Author (CLA) for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) Third and Fourth Assessment Reports 2001 and 2007 taking responsibility for the chapters on greenhouse gas mitigation from a cross-sectoral perspective. He is an applied economist with over 100 articles and book chapters published mainly on the topics of economic modelling, international trade, and climate change mitigation. His research interests are in developing large-scale models of the energy-environment-economy (E3) system designed to address the issue of global decarbonisation and he has led teams developing models at the UK, European and global scales.

Emanuele Campiglio

Emanuele Campiglio is Assistant Professor at the Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU) and Visiting Fellow at the Grantam Research Institute of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Emanuele is also currently leading the ‘Green Macro’ work package of the Mistra Financial Systems programme. His most recent work focuses on macroeconomic modelling and sustainable finance. Other research interests include growth theory, resource dynamics, climate change economics, finance and banking. Emanuele holds a B.Sc. in Economics from Bocconi University, a M.Sc. in Cooperation and International Economic Integration and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Pavia.

Petra Dünhaupt

Petra Dünhaupt holds a PhD in Economics from Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg and is currently a Research Fellow at the HTW Berlin – University of Applied Sciences. She is a member of the Institute for International Political Economy Berlin (IPE) and a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the Review of Political Economy. Her research focuses on financialisation and income distribution.


Jesus Ferreiro Prof Jesús Ferreiro is Professor in Economics at the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, in Bilbao, Spain, and an Associate Member of the Centre for Economic and Public Policy, University of Cambridge, and an Associate Member of the NIFIP, University of Porto. His research interests are in the areas of macroeconomic policy, labour market and international economy. He has published a number of articles on those topics in edited books and in refereed journals such as American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Applied Economics, Economic and Industrial Democracy, European Planning Studies, International Labour Review, International Review of Applied Economics, Journal of Economic Issues, Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Panoeconomicus, and Transnational Corporations, among others.

Antoine

Antoine Godin is an Associate Professor of Economics at Kingston University. He holds a M.Sc. in applied mathematics engineering and a Ph.D. in economics. He has developed two modelling software: a R package to design, calibrate and simulate Stock-Flow Consistent (SFC) models (github.com/s120/pksfc), and a java platform to design and simulate Agent-Based Stock-Flow Consistent (AB-SFC) models (github.com/s120/jmab). Antoine has published numerous articles both on methodological and theoretical aspects, combining various strands of literature, and applied to diverse topics such as environmental, labour or innovation economics in journal such as the Journal of Evolutionary Economics, the Cambridge journal of Economics or the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control. Antoine is frequently invited to teach advanced macro-modelling lectures on the SFC or AB-SFC approach.


Carmen Gomez

Prof Carmen Gómez is Associate Professor in Economics at the University of the Basque Country, in Bilbao, Spain. Her research interests are in the areas of macroeconomic policy, labour market and international economy. She has published a number of articles on those topics in edited books and in refereed journals such as American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Economic and Industrial Democracy, Journal of Economic Issues, Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Panoeconomicus, and Transnational Corporations, among others.

Eckhard Hein

 

Prof Eckhard Hein is Professor of Economics at the Berlin School of Economics and Law, the Co-Director of the Institute for International Political Economy Berlin (IPE), a Research Associate at the Levy Economics Institute at Bard College, a member of the coordination committee of the Research Network Macroeconomics and Macroeconomic Policies (FMM), and managing co-editor of the European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention. His research focuses on money, financial systems, distribution and growth, European economic policies and post-Keynesian macroeconomics. He has published widely in refereed academic journals, such as the Cambridge Journal of Economics, the International Review of Applied Economics, the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Metroeconomica and the Review of Political Economy, among several others. His latest authored books are The Macroeconomics of Finance-dominated Capitalism – and its Crisis (Edward Elgar, 2012) and Distribution and Growth after Keynes: A Post-Keynesian Guide (Edward Elgar, 2014).

Eric Kemp-Benedict is a senior scientist at the Stockholm Environment Institute. With a PhD in theoretical physics from Boston University, his research focuses on macroeconomic analysis for sustainable consumption and production. At SEI he has contributed to studies on diverse topics of relevance to sustainability at national, regional, and global levels, and has developed and applied tools and methods for participatory and study-specific sustainability analyses. Eric led SEI’s Rethinking Development theme for two years, and served for three years as director of SEI’s Asia Centre. He is currently based in the Boston area.

Marta

 

Marta Kulesza is a second-year double degree Master’s student in International Economics at the Berlin School and Economics and Law and in Economic Policies and Analysis and the Université Paris 13. She completed her Bachelor’s degree in Economics at the University of Glasgow. Her areas of interest include political economy, distribution and growth and Post-Keynesian macroeconomics. She is currently writing her Master dissertation about hyperinflation in Venezuela.


Sini Matikainen is a policy analyst at the Grantham Research Institute at the London School of Economics. Prior to joining Grantham, she worked at the European Systemic Risk Board (ESRB) Secretariat at the European Central Bank on the potential systemic risk to the financial sector of a transition to a low-carbon economy. She holds a BA in economics, with distinction, from Stanford University and an MSc in Environment and Development, with distinction, from the LSE. Her research interests include green finance, sustainable development, and international and European climate policy.



Malcolm Sawyer Prof Malcolm Sawyer is Emeritus Professor of Economics, Leeds University Business School, University of Leeds, UK. He has been the principal investigator for the European Union funded research project Financialisation, Economy, Society and Sustainable Development (FESSUD: www.fessud.eu). He was the managing editor of International Review of Applied Economics for over three decades, and has served on the editorial board of a range of journals and editor of the series New Directions in Modern Economics. He has published widely in the areas of post Keynesian and Kaleckian economics, industrial economics and the UK and European economies. He has authored 11 books and edited 24, has published over 100 papers in refereed journals and contributed chapters to over 100 books.

Ahmad Seyf Dr Ahmad Seyf is currently teaching at the Department of Management and Human Resources at Regent’s University-London. He has also taught at Staffordshire University and the University of Boston’s London campus. His main research interests are International Business Economics, Globalisation and the Economic and Social History of the Middle East, and Economic Policies. He is a bilingual writer having written extensively on Iran, his country of birth. His recent publications include, ‘Population and Agricultural Development in Iran, 1800-1906’ in Middle Eastern Studies, 2009 and ‘Iran and the Great Famine, 1870-72’ in Middle Eastern Studies, 2010. His published books include the following titles: ‘Iran’s Contemporary Political Economy’, H&S Media, 2012; ‘The Economy of Iran under Ahmadinejad’, H&S Media 2012; ‘Crisis in Despotism in Iran’, Ameh Press, Tehran, 2014; ‘Capitalism and Democracy’, Mazmoon books, Tehran 2016; ‘The Great Recession, an Iranian View’, Tehran, Mazmoon books (forthcoming); and ‘On the Negation of Neoliberalism’, Tehran, Hezareh-Sevvom (Forthcoming).

Phil Tomlinson

Philip R Tomlinson is Associate Professor in Business Economics at the University of Bath School of Management, where he is also a convenor for the Institute for Policy Research (IPR). His research interests predominantly focus upon economic governance, regional development and industrial policy, where he has published extensively in some of the world’s leading academic journals. He also co-edited Crisis or Recovery in Japan: State and Industrial Economy (2007, Edward Elgar, with David Bailey and Dan Coffey) and has contributed to several edited volumes. He has addressed the All Party Parliamentary Manufacturing Group on industrial policy and also worked closely with the British Ceramic Confederation on issues relating to the development of the ceramics industry.

 
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